Install Theme
are-soul:

Dark/Glow Pale

are-soul:

Dark/Glow Pale

(Source: theheavenlydemon, via confucius-ness)

red-lipstick:

Sean Morris aka SE▲N MOЯЯIS - Blackwater Bodysurfing from Beach Club!, 2008     Drawings: Ink on Board

red-lipstick:

Sean Morris aka SE▲N MOЯЯIS - Blackwater Bodysurfing from Beach Club!, 2008     Drawings: Ink on Board

(Source: Flickr / illsean)

If I knew for a certainty that a man was coming to my house with the conscious design of doing me good, I should run for my life.

Henry David Thoreau

Walden

(via fuckyeahthoreau)

linguisten:

futurejournalismproject:

Mapping Perspective
Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…
…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.
Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

I had that map in my office for 6 years. Not a week passed by without someone questioning my motive of putting it up. 


:: Maps are political. They create importance hegemonically— equating importance with orientation.

linguisten:

futurejournalismproject:

Mapping Perspective

Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…

…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.

Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

I had that map in my office for 6 years. Not a week passed by without someone questioning my motive of putting it up. 

:: Maps are political. They create importance hegemonically— equating importance with orientation.

(via sambwmn)

sinidentidades:

The racist immigrants carry disease rhetoric is nothing new. 

Perhaps we need a U.S. history lesson:

Under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, the U.S. forged a program, through a series of agreements with Mexico’s PRI-dominated government, called the Bracero program. This program was used to fill in the gaps in manual labor the U.S. had after the war.

It sounds like a liberal dream: immigrants being given an opportunity to work in the “land of opportunity,” yet it was hardly that. The laborers were forced into horrible working conditions. Many died from exhaustion (often from working in the sun too long) from working in the fields picking food for the U.S. Many also suffered from disease.

The U.S. decided what was best for the issue of disease: a widespread use of a highly toxic livestock pesticide that braceros were often doused in as part of processing into the U.S.

(via sambwmn)

"A Bitter Disappointment," Edward Said on His Encounter with Sartre, de Beauvoir and Foucault →

(Source: critical-theory)

(Source: jbinjapan, via ladyist)

cupidchild:

Sidney Sime, the Tomb of Zai, illustration for Time and the Gods by Lord Dunsany, 1906

cupidchild:

Sidney Sime, the Tomb of Zai, illustration for Time and the Gods by Lord Dunsany, 1906

(Source: darkclassics.blogspot.com, via midwinter-tears)

arabellesicardi:

Here is a side by side comparison of how The New York Times has profiled Michael Brown — an 18 year old black boy gunned down by police — and how they profiled Ted Bundy, one of the most prolific serial killers of all time. 

Source for Brown, Source for Bundy.

(via sambwmn)

KAS-PRODUCT


Brie Moreno
Before, after

Brie Moreno

Before, after

(Source: miss-catastrofes-naturales, via ggiver)